Wonder.land: a new musical by Damon Albarn and Moira Buffini

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Welcome to wonder.land, where you can be exactly who you want to be.

A brand new musical inspired by Lewis Carroll’s iconic
Alice in Wonderland, with music by Damon Albarn and
book and lyrics by Moira Buffini.

The adventure will start here.

wonder.land

When I found out I was going to see wonder.land, (which was approximately 35 minutes before the show started courtesy of a brilliant birthday surprise from my dear friend Gem), I was super excited, but didn’t know quite what to expect.

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“Meet me at The Palace Theatre at 7pm …”

I hadn’t heard much about it but the hot pink, semi faced Cheshire Cat on the billboard astride the Palace Theatre told me that I could expect some Alice and Wonderland type shenanigans with a modern twist. Sold. After the obligatory purchase of  showtime sustenance (giant buttons, obvs) we descended into our seats in the rafters (seriously, there should be parachutes or some kind of safety apparatus provided in those seats. I felt very much like a seagull coming to roost on a steep cliff face. But without the wings. I’m quite sure I developed vertigo.)

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View of the stage from the rafters at the Palace Theatre

The show began with our modern day Alice (Aly) in her rather drab bedroom, introducing us to her life and the other life in the game Wonder.land that is about to swallow Aly and the audience whole.  Aly uses wonder.land to escape her world, in which she is struggling to fit in at a new school that she has moved to due to a breakdown in her family. The drabness of her room is soon replaced by a psychedelic array of colours, textures, special effects and sounds that appear to filter from her imagination as she begins to play the game. Here, she creates an avatar that looks like the classic image of Alice that we all know and love.

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The White Rabbit and Aly’s avatar, Alice (theskinny.co.uk)

There is a wonderful amalgamation of real actors and visual effects on stage which creates a very other-worldly feel.  The Cheshire Cat is a little bit creepy, gliding across the stage in his ethereal, projected form, while the mad hatter (a real humanoid) pops up every so often throughout the musical in various locations, guiding the characters into ever mischievous adventures.

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The Cheshire Cat

I enjoyed the modern back story, which depicted the adolescent Alice’s attempt to survive a new school environment and wove together with Lewis Carroll’s original characters. As Aly guides Alice through Wonder.land, she meets these other characters, such as an egg and a lizard who are fellow students of Aly’s. We also meet the Caterpillar and of course the ominous White Rabbit who must be followed!  I thought some of the scenes were a little inconsequential and didn’t really add to the story. Some of the scenes with Aly’s errant dad felt a little forced like they were trying to eke out the story.

My absolute favourite character (I think possibly of all time) is Alice Manxome, the slightly delusional and very hilarious head teacher at Aly’s new school. She was just brilliant. She provided the most laughs, had the best voice by far and gave the musical a bit more oomph for the adults in the audience, the rest of the show being aimed more at teenagers. A particular favourite line was during a conversation between Ms Manxome and an errant student, which went a little something like this:

Student:

But Miss, I have dyslexia!

Ms Manxome:

We didn’t have dyslexia in my day. We had a condition                                called Thick.

Controversial, perhaps but that got the biggest laugh/ applause of the evening. This one line essentially sums her up. I love her.

Alice Manxome and her manipulated version of Alice with Aly watching helplessly on. (scscircle.com)

Alice Manxome is also a very cleverly placed, pivotal character that links the two worlds together. After confiscating Aly’s phone and placing her in detention (Ms Manxome delights in the habitual humiliation and incarceration of her students) the cruel head teacher provides our villain as she develops from simple Alice to a rather vicious Queen of Hearts character. She does this by assuming Alice’s avatar, making her as manipulative and malignant as she is. This of course causes problems for Aly who has to fight to save her character from the judging eyes of the other players (i.e. her fellow students at her new school) and worse, complete deletion from wonder.land.

While at times I did feel that I had stumbled into a show for the young ‘uns, I did enjoy it very much, weirdness and all. As well as being very entertaining, the show provided many good messages for the audience, young and old alike. There is a strong emphasis on “being yourself” and accepting yourself when others maybe don’t. Another message is to stand up to bullies, whether they be your peers or your superiors. There is also a strong commentary on the overwhelming use of technology in every day life. We’re all guilty of obsessively starting into our smartphones while dismissively grunting at the people in the real world who want to talk to us. When did it become socially acceptable to reach for your phone before saying “good morning” or playing games in lieu of having a conversation of an evening? It’s just rude, people. Look up and get a life. But read this blog first because its really good, then get a life.

Wonder.land has finished its run at The Palace Theatre in Manchester but it will be continuing Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland 150th anniversary celebrations in London from November 2015. You can watch the trailer here and read more about the 150th anniversary of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland here and here.

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